Paragon Colorectal Care

Paragon Colorectal Care
200 Medical Park Drive, Suite 400
Concord, NC 28025

704-786-1108
info@paragonsurg.com

Benny Y. Chong, MD, FACS, FASCRS

About Dr. Chong

Dr. Chong completed his fellowship training in Colon and Rectal Surgery at the Orlando Health Colon and Rectal Clinic in Orlando, Florida. He has a special interest in treating rectal cancer and anorectal disorders.

Our Services

Abscess
Anal fissures
Anal Fistulas
Anal Lesions
Appendectomy (removal of appendix)
Cancer surgery – Colon
Cancer surgery – Rectal
Cholecystectomy (removal of gallbladder)
Colectomy
Constipation
Crohn’s/UC
Fecal Incontinence
Hemorrhoidectomy (removal of hemorrhoids)
Hemorrhoid Banding
Hernia – Incisional/Ventral/Abdominal
Hernia – Umbilical (Gateway)
Lipomas
Masses
Moles & Cysts
Muscle Biopsies
Port placement/removal
Rectal Prolapse
Skin Tags
Thoracic surgery – Chest Tube Insertion
Abscess

An abscess is an infected cavity filled with pus near the anus or rectum. Most abscesses result from an acute infection in the anus internal glands. Occasionally an abscess may form when bacterial, fecal matter or other foreign material clogs an anal gland and tunnels into the tissue around the anus or rectum, collecting in a cavity.

Treating an abscess is usually done with a surgical drainage procedure, either in the office or hospital, depending on if a patient is prone to more significant infections (resulting from diabetes or decreased immunity, for example).

Anal fissures

An anal fissure is a tear in the lining of the anal canal or lower rectum. It often occurs when a person passes a large stool, is experiencing constipation or diarrhea or during childbirth. Fissures cause pain when trying to have a bowel movement thereafter.

Acute anal fissures will usually heal on their own within a few days or weeks when take proper home remedy steps. These include eating fruits, vegetables and fibrous foods and drinking fluids to help prevent constipation or hard stools, taking sitz baths to soothe torn tissue or using a nonprescription cream to help heal torn tissue.

Fissures that don’t heal within two to three months may require prescription medication or surgery (lateral internal sphincterotomy) to relax the spasm that is causing the fissure.

Anal Fistulas

Anal fistulas commonly occur as a result of a previous or current anal abscess. A fistula is a tunnel that forms under the skin, connecting clogged, infected glands to an abscess or may connect to the skin of the buttocks near the anal opening. An external opening can be seen that drains pus, blood or stool. Surgery is required to cure the condition.

Anal Lesions

Anal fistulas commonly occur as a result of a previous or current anal abscess. A fistula is a tunnel that forms under the skin, connecting clogged, infected glands to an abscess or may connect to the skin of the buttocks near the anal opening. An external opening can be seen that drains pus, blood or stool. Surgery is required to cure the condition.

Appendectomy (removal of appendix)

An appendectomy is the surgical removal of the appendix. It’s performed to treat appendicitis, an inflammatory condition of the appendix.

Symptoms of appendicitis include:

  • Stomach pain that begins suddenly near the belly button and spreads through the lower right side of the abdomen
  • Abdominal swelling
  • Rigid abdominal muscles
  • Constipation or diarrhea
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fever

It is important to seek medical attention immediately if appendicitis is suspected. An appendectomy must be performed right away to prevent complications.

Cancer surgery – Colon

Surgery is usually the treatment option for earlier-stage colon cancer. The type of surgery performed depends on the extent of the cancer, where it is located and the patient’s and physician’s treatment goals.

Some early stage cancers (stage 0 or 1) can be removed during a colonoscopy. A colectomy that removes all or part of the colon and nearby lymph nodes may be necessary. Your physician will discuss the surgical approach that works best.

Cancer surgery – Rectal

The type of rectal surgery performed is based largely on the extent of the cancer. Radiation and chemotherapy may be used before or after surgery as well.

If the cancer is at stage 0 and hasn’t grown beyond the inner rectum lining, removing or destroying the cancer is usually all that is required. More involved procedures will be beneficial for more advanced stages of cancer. You and your physician will discuss the surgical approach that works best for your particular diagnosis.

Cholecystectomy (removal of gallbladder)

A cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gall bladder, the organ that sits below the liver on the right side of the abdomen that’s responsible for collecting and storing bile.

Cholecystectomies are commonly performed to treat gallstones and their accompanying complications. The procedure may be recommended if a patient has:

  • Gallstones in the gallbladder
  • Gallstones in the bile duct
  • Gallbladder inflammation
  • Pancreas inflammation resulting from gallstones

This is a fairly common surgery and patients usually go home the same day.

Colectomy

A colectomy is a surgical procedure that removes some or the entire colon. Conditions where a colectomy may be recommended include: Examples include:

  • Crohn’s disease
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Diverticulitis
  • Colon cancer
  • Bowel obstruction
  • Uncontrollable rectal/colon bleeding

There are different types of colectomy procedures. Your physician can discuss treatment options that best suit your particular condition.

Constipation

Constipation is a common condition that some people may experience acutely or chronically. Going three or more days without a bowel movement causes the stool to become harder and more difficult to pass. Home remedies such as drinking water and adding fruits, vegetables and fiber to the diet can help eliminate and prevent constipation. In some cases stool softeners or laxatives may be needed.

Constipation can also be a symptom of intestinal or bowel disease. Patients should contact a physician if constipation is a new symptom, is accompanied by blood in the stool or lasts more than two weeks.

Crohn’s/UC

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that causes inflammation of the digestive tract that leads to abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue and weight loss. Different areas of the digestive tract can be affected.

Ulcerative colitis affects the lining of the large intestine and rectum, causing long-lasting inflammation and ulcers. Symptoms include rectal pain or bleeding, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, weight loss and urgency or inability to have a bowel movement.

Both conditions do not have a cure but can be managed through dietary changes and medicines. In extreme cases when both do not help, surgery may be recommended.

Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence is the inability to control bowel movements, causing stool to leak unexpectedly from the rectum. Diarrhea, constipation or muscle or nerve damage can cause fecal incontinence. It can range from occasional stool leakage while passing gas to a complete loss of bowel control. Medications, dietary changes and exercises can help prevent fecal incontinence, but surgery may be required in some cases.

Hemorrhoidectomy (removal of hemorrhoids)

A hemorrhoidectomy is a procedure that removes large external hemorrhoids and prolapsed internal hemorrhoids (protruding from the rectum).

Patients are given general or spinal anesthesia. The physician makes an incision in the tissue surrounding the hemorrhoid, ties off the vein inside the hemorrhoid to prevent bleeding and removes the hemorrhoid. Patients can usually go home the same day and recovery time can take two to three weeks.

Hemorrhoid Banding

Hemorrhoid banding is a procedure used to treat internal hemorrhoids, by tying off the hemorrhoid at its base with rubber bands and cutting blood flow. The hemorrhoid shrinks and dies, falling off in about one week. The procedure is very successful in treating internal hemorrhoids in just one appointment.

Hernia – Incisional/Ventral/Abdominal

A hernia is a bulge caused by tissue pushing through the wall of muscle that’s holding it in. It sometimes feels like a soft lump that may go away when you press on it or lay down. The area can be painful, especially when coughing, bending over or lifting something.

Ventral or abdominal hernias can occur at any location along the abdominal wall. Many occur at the location of a previous surgery (incisional hernia) and can develop months or even years after a procedure is performed. Incisional hernias often occur along a vertical incision point. An umbilical hernia occurs in babies under six months old and happens near the belly button as a result of intestine, fat or fluid pushing through a weak spot in the belly.

Umbilical hernias often go away on their own before age one but may require surgery if still present past this age. Other hernias require surgery to correct.

Hernia – Umbilical (Gateway)

An umbilical hernia occurs in babies under six months old and happens near the belly button as a result of intestine, fat or fluid pushing through a weak spot in the belly.

Umbilical hernias often go away on their own before age one but may require surgery if still present past this age. Other hernias require surgery to correct.

Lipomas

A lipoma is a slow-growing fatty lump usually situated between the skin and the underlying muscle layer. It is not cancerous and most often harmless. Treatment is usually not necessary, but can be removed if the patient finds it painful, bothersome or it continues to grow.

People often confuse lipomas with cysts. Cysts are filled with fluid, located close to the skin surface and sometimes can be drained. Lipomas consist of fat cells, are located deeper below the skin surface and require surgery for removal.

Masses

A mass is any type of abnormal growth on the body. There are a variety of reasons masses form. Abnormal growth of cells, hormonal changes and an immune reaction are examples. It’s important to have a new mass examined to determine if it is benign (non-cancerous), malignant (cancerous) or poses any other medical concern based on its size, location, composition or shape. Removal may be beneficial or necessary.

Moles & Cysts

Moles and cysts are very common types of skin growths that sometimes require removal.

Moles are raised or flat clusters of heavily pigmented skin cells. Most pose no danger, but they should be monitored for changes that may indicate the possible presence of skin cancer. It’s important to be aware of changes in shape, size or color as well as flat moles that become raised or moles that suddenly start to itch or bleed. Any newly appearing moles should also be monitored.

Cysts are sac-like pockets of tissue that can grow on your skin or in other parts of your body. They are filled with fluid, air or another substance and come in different shapes and sizes. Most cysts are benign and not harmful, but should be monitored for changes, infection or pain. They can be removed for medical or cosmetic reasons.

Muscle Biopsies

This outpatient procedure is done to help detect any diseases or infections in the muscles. A small tissue sample is removed and sent to an external laboratory for testing. Muscular disorders, blood vessel or connective tissues diseases and muscle infections or defects can be detected.

Port placement/removal

This medical device makes cancer treatments more manageable and easier by allowing caregivers to give treatments through a vein. Chemotherapy, blood transfusions, antibiotics and IV fluids are often administered using a port, a small plastic or metal disc attached to a vein by way of a catheter. Ports reduce the number of needle sticks throughout treatment, reduce muscle or tissue damage and allow for more than one treatment or medication at a time.

Rectal Prolapse

A rectal prolapse occurs when part of or the entire wall of the rectum slides out of place and can stick out of the anus. A partial prolapse happens when the lining of the rectum falls out. A complete prolapse means the entire rectal wall slides out of place. When an internal prolapse occurs, a part of the wall of the colon or rectum may slide over another part.

Avoiding constipation and straining during bowel movements can help prevent prolapses. Surgery is required to heal a complete prolapse or a partial prolapse that doesn’t heal on its own.

Skin Tags

Skin tags are common, small, soft skin growths that tend to grow on the eyelids, neck, armpits, groin folds and under breasts. Almost everyone develops skin tags at some point in their lives. They are harmless but some people may want to remove due to irritation (rubbing against clothing) or for cosmetic reasons.

Thoracic surgery – Chest Tube Insertion

A chest tube helps drain air, blood or fluid in the pleural space, the area between the lungs and underneath the chest wall. It is sometimes after surgery to the lungs, heart or esophageal area.

Meet Benny Y. Chong, MD, FACS, FASCRS

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